She Persisted: Ruby Bridges

For my Literature for Youth class, we were tasked with choosing a short passage to annotate with meaningful hyperlinks. I was touched by Chelsea Clinton’s book She Persisted: 13 American Women who Changed the World. The language is accessible, and the the stories are inspiring. I particularly liked the depictions of each woman as a young girl. This touch helps young readers relate to historical figures that so often seem unreal, their accomplishments unattainable, but Clinton and illustrator Alexadra Boiger remind us that each of these heroines was once a little girl.

The following passage from the text is about Ruby Bridges a child who stood firm in the face of hate and fear.

“When Ruby Bridges was in kindergarten, many schools across America, particularly in the South, still refused African American students their equal right to an education. Ruby wouldn’t be treated like a second-class student, and she persisted, walking for weeks past angry, hateful protesters to integrate an all-white elementary school in New Orleans(Clinton, 2017).

I chose this particular passage for the assignment because Ruby Bridges is one of the key historical figures addressed within our third grade social studies curriculum. I am always moved by the bravery and the steadfastness she was able to show as a young child. The interview linked above where she discusses her perspective at such a young age breaks my heart every time I hear it. The provided hyperlinks lead to articles, videos, and images with more information about this time period. This assignment could be adapted into an interesting and engaging Thinglink for use in the classroom.

Clinton, C., & Boiger, A. (2017). She persisted: 13 American women who changed the world. New York, NY: Philomel Books.

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